Jerusalem


JERUSALEM WEATHER

What has not already been said about the holiest city in the world, the city that has been united, the eternal city first built thousands of years ago, whose history can be heard in the whispering of the wind along the walls, where every stone tells a wondrous story of a city that has drawn millions of faithful pilgrims for thousands of years.

Such is Jerusalem, the capital of Israel, the only city in the world that has 70 names of love and yearning, the city that in old maps appears at the center of the world and is still adored like a young bride.





Jerusalem is a city of overwhelming emotions, a city that promises a religious and spiritual experience, excitement and pleasure, interesting tours and entertaining adventures. Here, alongside Jerusalem's fascinating historic and archeological sites, there are amazingly modern tourist attractions for all lovers of culture, the arts, theater and music, architecture and gastronomic delights.

If you are wondering how Jerusalem became such a center of religions and spirituality and a pilgrimage site for millions of tourists from around the world, the answer begins thousands of years ago. Jerusalem's history is one of wars and struggles. Its strategic location attracted many nations that wanted to capture the city, and some of them did rule over it for various periods. This city has known war and peace, love and hate, riches and poverty, destruction and renewal, happiness and pain.



Places to visit in Jerusalem


Old city | New city | Night life


Old City

At Jerusalem's heart is The Old City, which is surrounded by a wall and divided into four quarters: The Jewish, Armenian, Christian, and Muslim. Inside the walls are the important holy sites of the three major religions.


The Western Wall

( Ha-Kotel Ha-Ma'aravi ) is part of a big renovation project initiated by King Herod. In the year 37 BCE, Herod was appointed king in Jerusalem and he soon initiated a huge renovation project for the Temple He hired many workers who toiled to make the Temple more magnificent and to widen the area of the Temple Mount by flattening the mountain peak and building four support walls around it. The Western Wall is the western support wall built during this widening of the Temple Mount Plaza. The Second Temple was destroyed in the year 70 CE. Despite the destruction that took place, all four Temple Mount support walls remained standing. Throughout the generations since the Temple's destruction, the Western Wall was the remnant closest to the site of the Temple's Holy of Holies that was accessible to Jews. Therefore, it became a place of prayer and yearning for Jews around the world. When Jews expressed their longing for Jerusalem through song, Judaica, jewelry, and prayer, the image of Jerusalem was conveyed via the image of the Western Wall. The Old City of Jerusalem, and the Western Wall within it, was not in Jewish hands from the War of Independence in 1948 until the Six Day War in 1967.


The Western Wall Tunnels

- In the nineteenth century, the most distinguished Jerusalem scholars were already trying to determine the precise measurements of the Western Wall and describe the methods used in its construction However, their information was incomplete, mainly because they were unable to discover the wall's entire length. Nevertheless, British researchers Charles Wilson, in 1864 and Charles Warren, in 1867-1870, uncovered the northern extension of the Western Wall Prayer Plaza. The shafts that Charles Warren dug through Wilson's Arch can still be seen today. Immediately after the Six Day War, the Ministry of Religious Affairs began the project of exposing the entire length of the Western Wall. It was a difficult operation, which involved digging beneath residential neighborhoods that had been constructed on ancient structures from the Second Temple period and were built up against the Western Wall. Some residents used underground spaces as water holes or for sewage collection. The excavations required close supervision by experts in the fields of structural engineering, securing subterranean tunnels, archeology, and of course, Jewish Law.


The Davidson Center

- The newly constructed Ethan and Marla Davidson Exhibition and Virtual Reconstruction Center is situated at the entrance to the Jerusalem Archaeological Park, one of the largest, most significant archaeological sites in the country. It is some 100 meters south of the Temple Mount complex, in the recently excavated and restored underground storage complex belonging to a seventh century CE Umayyad Palace. The new center offers the visitor an in-depth archaeological and historical introduction to the Jerusalem Archaeological Park by means of an exhibition of archaeological objects, augmented by visual, textual and audio information. One of the highlights of this modern facility is a real-time virtual reality reconstruction of the Herodian Temple Mount as it stood prior to its destruction by Roman troops in the year 70 CE. Real-time technology allows users to interact with the computer environment, enjoying freedom of movement as in the physical world.






The Jewish Quarter

of the Old City of Jerusalem incorporates many holy and historical sites, and is an outstanding starting point for any tour of Jerusalem, from family tours through to guided study tours. In the Jewish Quarter, between the alleyways of the Old City, you will find sites that are both well known and new, restaurants, and other surprises that will turn your outing into something special. The Western Wall, the City of David, the Temple Institute, the Herodian Quarter, the Courtyard of the Old Yishuv, The Hurva Synagogue and other interesting sites are all easily accessible in the Jewish Quarter, and will make you tour of Jerusalem colorful and easy to plan. "Pray for the peace of Jerusalem: they shall prosper that love thee" (Psalms 122).


David's Citadel

( The Tower of David ) is an ancient citadel located near the Jaffa Gate entrance to the Old City of Jerusalem. The citadel was built to strengthen a strategically weak point in the Old City's defenses, the citadel that stands today was constructed during the 2nd century BCE and subsequently destroyed and rebuilt by, in succession, the Christian, Muslim, Mamluk, and Ottoman conquerors of Jerusalem. It contains important archaeological finds dating back 2,700 years, and is a popular venue for benefit events, craft shows, concerts, and sound-and-light performances.

The name "Tower of David" is due to Byzantine Christians who believed the site to be the palace of King David.


City of David

- The story of the City of David began over 3,000 years ago, when King David left the city of Hebron for a small hilltop city known as Jerusalem, establishing it as the unified capital of the tribes of Israel. Years later, David's son, King Solomon, built the First Temple next to the City of David on top of Mount Moriah, the site of the binding of Isaac, and with it, this hilltop became one of the most important sites in the world. Today, the story of the City of David continues. Deep underground, the City of David is revealing some of the most exciting archeological finds of the ancient world. While above ground, the city is a vibrant center of activity with a visitor's center that welcomes visitors for an exciting tour to the site where much of the Bible was written.


The Dome of the Rock

is the oldest Islamic monument that stands today and certainly one of the most beautiful. It also boasts the oldest surviving mihrab (niche indicating the direction of Mecca) in the world. The sacred rock over which the Dome of the Rock is built was considered holy before the arrival of Islam. Jews believed, and still believe, the rock to be the very place where Abraham prepared to sacrifice Isaac (an event which Muslims place in Mecca). In addition, the Dome of the Rock (or the adjacent Dome of the Chain) is believed by many to stand directly over the site of the Holy of Holies of both Solomon's Temple and Herod's Temple. The Dome of the Rock was built by the Umayyad caliph Abd al-Malik from 688 to 691 AD. It was not intended to be a mosque, but a shrine for pilgrims. According to tradition, the Dome of the Rock was built to commemorate Muhammad's ascension into heaven after his night journey to Jerusalem (Qur'an 17). But there seems to have been more to it than this, since the Dome of the Ascension was later built nearby.


The Christian quarter

was built around the Church of the Holy Sepulchre which is the heart of the quarter. Around the church there are other churches and monasteries. In general the quarter contains few houses, which are mostly concentrated in the southern-eastern part of the quarter near Jericho Gate. It contains mostly religious tourists and educational buildings, such as the Lutheran school and St. Pierre school. Christian buildings stand on much of the quarter. Besides the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, which occupies most of the land, the Patriarchate of the Greek Orthodox, the Franciscan monastery, San Salvatore and the Latin Patriarchate take up large areas as well. The quarter also contains souvenir shops, coffee houses, restaurants and hotels. The shops are mostly concentrated in the market street, David Street, and along the Christian Road. Some of the hotels (such as the Casa Nova hotel and the Greek Catholic hotel) were built by the churches as places for visitors to stay. Others are private hotels. The quarter also contains some small museums (such as the museum of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate). In the southwest part of the quarter there is a pool called Hezkiyahu's Pool that was used to store rain water for the area.






Church of the Holy Sepulcher

Originally built by the mother of Emperor Constantine in 330 A.D., the Church of the Holy Sepulcher commemorates the hill of crucifixion and the tomb of Christ's burial. On grounds of tradition alone, this church is the best candidate for the location of these events. The Garden Tomb was not identified as such until the 19th century. The original Byzantine church was destroyed by the Persians in 614 A.D. Rebuilt shortly thereafter, the Egyptian caliph al-Hakim destroyed the church in 1009 and had the tomb hacked down to bedrock. The Crusaders rebuilt the church and much of what is standing today is from that time period. The ladder in the upper right window has been there since at least 1860, a testimony to rivalries between the church's factions. Inside the church is a rocky outcropping which is the traditional place where the cross was placed. Archaeological excavations have demonstrated that this site was outside the city but close to one of its gates and thus would have been a good location for a crucifixion. Today this chapel is controlled by the Greek Orthodox Church.


Via Dolorosa

- The Via Dolorosa(Latin for Way of Grief or Way of Suffering) is a street, in two parts, within the Old City of Jerusalem, held to be Jesus' final path, which according to Christian tradition led from the courthouse to Golgotha Hill, where he was crucified and buried. The current route has been established since the 18th century, replacing various earlier versions.
It is today marked by nine Stations of the Cross; there have been fourteen stations since the late 15th century, with the remaining five stations being inside the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The route starts in the Muslim Quarter, at Lions' Gate, and passes the 14 stations of the cross, ending at the Church of the Holy Sepulcher.
Many Christian pilgrims come to Jerusalem every year to follow Jesus' footsteps along the route.


Mount Zion and Dormition Abbey

- Southwest of the Old City is Mt. Zion, where the Dormition Abbey was built on the site Christian tradition believes Mary spent her last night. The abbey was built about 100 years ago and in the basement there is a statue of the sleeping Mary. Beside the abbey is the Room of the Last Supper, where Jesus ate his last meal. This complex was constructed by Kaiser Wilhelm II beginning in 1900. The church was built in response to a request to have a German Catholic church in the city following the Kaiser's support for the construction of the Lutheran Church of the Redeemer in 1898.
The modern Mt. Zion is a misnomer applied by Byzantine pilgrims who thought that the larger, flatter Western Hill must be the original City of David. Archaeological evidence has shown that this hill was only incorporated within the city's fortifications in the 8th century B.C. but the name has stuck. The Hinnom Valley borders this hill on its western and southern sides.


Mount of Olives

is the hill on the eastern side of Kidron Valley which facing the Old City of Jerusalem. Its name came from the olive trees that once grew on its hillside from ancient times. According to Jewish tradition, the Messiah will appear here and bring the dead back to life. Therefore, the hillside became the most holiest cemetery, and the hillside is covered by thousands of grave stones. In Mount of Olives there are also many other important Christian sites, and several churches:




New Jerusalem

The construction of the new city's Jewish neighborhoods began in the late 19th century. Some of the neighborhoods have retained their original picturesque charm, and wandering among the houses is a real pleasure.

Yemin Moshe

was established in 1891 by Moses Montefiore outside Jerusalem's Old City as a solution to the overcrowding and unsanitary conditions inside the walls, and eventually named for him. Few people were anxious to live there at the time, because the area was open to Arab marauders. The original houses were built with a wall around them and a gate that was locked at night. Mishkenot Sha'ananim, as the first houses were known, consisted of two rows of buildings. The first was completed by 1860 and contained 28 apartments of one-and-a-half rooms. The compound also had a water cistern with an iron pump imported from England, a mikveh and a communal oven. The second row of houses was built in 1866 when a cholera epidemic was at its height in the Old City. Some of the people who took up residence in the new neighborhood refused to stay there at night, but that year, the demand for apartments rose as illness spread.


The German Colony

(Ha-Moshava Ha-Germanit) is a neighborhood in Jerusalem, established in the second half of the 19th century by members of the German Temple Society. Today the Moshava, as it is popularly known, is an upscale neighborhood bisected by Emek Refaim Street, an avenue lined with trendy shops, restaurants and cafes.
The Arab residents of Katamon fled in 1948, in the wake of fierce battles for control of the area during the Israeli War of Independence. The abandoned homes in the German Colony and other parts of Katamon were used to house new immigrants. Since the end of the 20th century, the neighborhood has undergone a process of gentrification. Efforts are being made to restore old landmark buildings and incorporate some of their architectural features, such as arched windows and tiled roofs, in new construction. Numerous cafes, bars, restaurants, and boutiques have opened in the neighborhood, and many affluent families have moved there, pushing up the price of real estate. The German Colony has a large English-speaking population, with the English speaking community comprising both families and singles, permanent immigrants and visitors. The neighborhood is home to the Smadar Theater, Jerusalem's arthouse cinema and a perennial gathering place for the artisterati.


Nachlaot

is a cluster of neighborhoods in central Jerusalem, Israel known for its narrow, winding lanes, old-style housing, hidden courtyards and many small synagogues. The neighborhoods that make up the Nachlaot (plural of nachala, lit. "homestead") district were established outside the walls of the Old City beginning in the late 1860s as the Jewish Quarter became increasingly overcrowded and unsanitary. Mishkenot Yisrael was built in 1875. The name comes from a biblical verse (Numbers 24:5): "How goodly are thy tents, O Jacob/Thy dwellings, O Israel." Mazkeret Moshe was founded by Sir Moses Montefiore in 1882 as an Ashkenazi neighborhood. Ohel Moshe is a Sephardi neighborhood established alongside it. Former Israeli president Yitzhak Navon grew up in Ohel Moshe, and the neighborhood served as the inspiration for his play Bustan Sephardi (Sephardi Orchard). The Banai family, a famous family of actors and singers, lived in Nachlaot. A Syrian Jewish community settled in Nachlaot in 1900 and built the Ades Synagogue, which was completed in 1901. Jerusalem's Mahane Yehuda outdoor market is located next to Nachlaot. Rabbi Aryeh Levin, known as the "prisoners' rabbi" for his visits to members of the Jewish underground imprisoned in the Russian Compound, lived in Mishkenot Yisrael. Nahalat Ahim, south of Rehov Bezalel, was founded in 1925 for the Yemenite community.






Mahane Yehuda Market

, often referred to as "The Shuk", is an outdoor marketplace in Jerusalem, Israel. Popular with locals and tourists alike, the market's more than 250 vendors sell fresh fruits and vegetables; baked goods; fish, meat and cheeses; nuts, seeds, and spices; wines and liquors; clothing and shoes; housewares, textiles, and Judaica. In and around the market are falafel and shawarma stands, juice bars, cafes and meat restaurants. The color and bustle of the marketplace is accentuated by vendors who call out their prices to passersby. On Thursdays and Fridays, the marketplace is abuzz with shoppers stocking up for Shabbat.



Ben Yehuda Street

is a major street in downtown Jerusalem, known as the "Midrachov". It is now a pedestrian mall and closed to vehicular traffic. The street is lined with souvenir and Judaica shops and sidewalk cafes, and street musicians play there throughout the day. Your stroll down the Ben-Yehuda pedestrian mall is a good chance to meet Israelis from all walks of life, especially on Saturday night as stores and cafes re-open after the Sabbath ends and it becomes especially popular with the teenage and young adult crowd.
Ben Yehuda Street is named after the founder of Modern Hebrew, Eliezer Ben-Yehuda.



Nahalat Shiv'a

is a neighborhood in central Jerusalem, Israel. Nahalat Shiv'a was the third neighborhood built outside the Old City of Jerusalem in the 1860s. Today it is a crowded pedestrian promenade lined with sidewalk cafes. Shiv'a was the second residential neighborhood built outside the city walls. It was founded in 1869 as a cooperative effort by seven Jerusalem families who pooled their funds to purchase the land and build homes. Lots were cast and Yosef Rivlin won the right to build the first house in the neighborhood. In 1873, milk cows were imported from Amsterdam and a dairy was opened in Nahalat Shiv'a. A carriage service to Jaffa Gate was inaugurated that summer.


YMCA

The cornerstone for the Jerusalem YMCA was laid in 1928 by Lord Plumer, the British High Commissioner for Palestine, on a plot of land in the West Nikephoria section of Jerusalem purchased from the Greek Orthodox Church Patriarchate. When the building opened on April 18, 1933, the event was attended by YMCA leaders from around the world. Every detail of the building, with its elegant arches, domes and tower, was described in the world press, which hailed it as a wellspring of cultural, athletic, social and intellectual life. Until 1991, the YMCA stadium was the only soccer stadium in Jerusalem. The building, still standing today, was designed by noted American architect Arthur Loomis Harmon of Shreve, Lamb and Harmon. The stadium was razed by developers to make way for a luxury housing project known as King David's Court.


Monastery of the Holy Cross

is Greek-Orthodox monastery, built as a fortress, located in the Rehaviah valley (Cross valley). According to tradition it is the site of the tree that was used to build the cross of the crucifixion. The monastery was initially built in the Byzantine period, during the 5th C AD. It was repaired by Caesar Justinian in the mid 6th C. The Monastery was destroyed during the Persian invasion (614AD). In 796 the Arabs butchered all the residing monks. It was rebuilt in the 11th C by a Georgian Monk, and enjoyed better times during the times of the Crusaders. The site was a large center in the 13-14th C, and hosted a hundreds of Georgian monks, scholars and poets. After the Crusaders left the city (1267AD) the site was under the control of the Mamelukes, who added a mosque inside the complex. During the times of the Mamluk ruler Baibars (1260-1277) the Church was demolished and the monks removed, but were permitted to return on 1305 after pressure from Byzantine.






Ein Karem

(Ein Kerem - Spring of the Vineyard) is an ancient village of the Jerusalem District and now a neighbourhood in southwest of Jerusalem. According to Christian tradition, John the Baptist was born in Ein Kerem, leading to the establishment of many churches and monasteries. In 2010, the neighborhood had a population of 2,000.It attracts three million visitors a year, one-third of them pilgrims from around the world.
Ein Karem, so close to the city and yet with such a different atmosphere, is also a great draw for Israeli visitors, whom you'll find strolling along the lanes with you, exploring the churches, browsing the little shops, savoring a cup of coffee or a meal, and just like you, enjoying a perfect interlude.


The Jerusalem Biblical Zoo

stretches across an area of 250 dunams (25 hectares or 62 acres) in a lovely valley surrounded by green hills and new neighbourhoods. The zoo encircles a small lake situated near the main gate. The lake is fed by a series of pools and waterfalls that flow one into the other. Spacious lawns and shady beauty spots surround the lake and pools. The water system is artificial, and relies on recycled water. The zoo is built on two main levels that house most of the animal exhibits. One main, circular route extends the length of both levels and connects most of the sites on the zoo grounds. Additional side paths also connect the two levels, and exhibits are situated along these paths as well.


The Knesset

is Israel's legislature. The Knesset first convened on 14 February 1949, following the 20 January elections, succeeding the Assembly of Representatives that had functioned as the Jewish community's parliament during the Mandate era.
The term "Knesset" is derived from the ancient Great Assembly or Great Synagogue which according to Jewish tradition was an assembly of 120 scribes, sages, and prophets, in the period from the end of the Biblical prophets to the time of the development of Rabbinic Judaism about two centuries ending c. 70 CE. There is, however, no organizational continuity and aside from the number of members little similarity, as the ancient Knesset was an essentially religious, completely unelected body. The Knesset sits on a hilltop in western Jerusalem in a district known as Sheikh Badr before the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, now Givat Ram. It was financed by James A. de Rothschild as a gift to the State of Israel. It was built on land leased from the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem. Before the construction of its permanent home, the Knesset met in the Jewish Agency building in Jerusalem, the Kessem Cinema building in Tel Aviv and the Froumine building in Jerusalem.


Sacher Park (Gan Sacher)

The first thing one notices when presented with the expanse of west Jerusalem's Gan Sacher (Sacher Park) is a simple plant common in much of the world but rare in the big cities and towns of Israel: grass. Jerusalem, for all its venerable charm, is not a particularly verdant city, with only its parks offering any large amount of green space. But the parks are impressive, and Gan Sacher is the best of the lot, a kilometers-long stretch of space separating Nachlaot and Rechavia from the government complex housing the Knesset and the Supreme Court.
The park's amenities include two play areas for children (one large and modern, the other old, wooden and emblematic of a more austere Israel), basketball courts, tennis courts, soccer pitches, a skateboarding park, a dog area, a walking/running path, and two tunnels which seem to serve as the communal canvas of Jerusalem's graffiti artist community. The park is often host to huge concerts during holidays and yearly festivals, and every inch of it is covered by grill-bearing families committed to having fun the only way they know how on Independence Day.




Nightlife areas in Jerusalem

People who like to go out in the evenings will love Jerusalem's main night life regions which include coffee shops, restaurants, bars, dance clubs, theaters, cinemas, street concerts and more different activites for all ages.

The German Colony

(Ha-Moshava Ha-Germanit) is a neighborhood in Jerusalem, established in the second half of the 19th century by members of the German Temple Society. Today the Moshava, as it is popularly known, is an upscale neighborhood bisected by Emek Refaim Street, an avenue lined with trendy shops, restaurants and cafes.
The Arab residents of Katamon fled in 1948, in the wake of fierce battles for control of the area during the Israeli War of Independence. The abandoned homes in the German Colony and other parts of Katamon were used to house new immigrants. Since the end of the 20th century, the neighborhood has undergone a process of gentrification. Efforts are being made to restore old landmark buildings and incorporate some of their architectural features, such as arched windows and tiled roofs, in new construction. Numerous cafes, bars, restaurants, and boutiques have opened in the neighborhood, and many affluent families have moved there, pushing up the price of real estate. The German Colony has a large English-speaking population, with the English speaking community comprising both families and singles, permanent immigrants and visitors. The neighborhood is home to the Smadar Theater, Jerusalem's arthouse cinema and a perennial gathering place for the artisterati.


Ben Yehuda Street

is a major street in downtown Jerusalem, known as the "Midrachov". It is now a pedestrian mall and closed to vehicular traffic. The street is lined with souvenir and Judaica shops and sidewalk cafes, and street musicians play there throughout the day. Your stroll down the Ben-Yehuda pedestrian mall is a good chance to meet Israelis from all walks of life, especially on Saturday night as stores and cafes re-open after the Sabbath ends and it becomes especially popular with the teenage and young adult crowd.
Ben Yehuda Street is named after the founder of Modern Hebrew, Eliezer Ben-Yehuda.



Nahalat Shiv'a

is a neighborhood in central Jerusalem, Israel. Nahalat Shiv'a was the third neighborhood built outside the Old City of Jerusalem in the 1860s. Today it is a crowded pedestrian promenade lined with sidewalk cafes. Shiv'a was the second residential neighborhood built outside the city walls. It was founded in 1869 as a cooperative effort by seven Jerusalem families who pooled their funds to purchase the land and build homes. Lots were cast and Yosef Rivlin won the right to build the first house in the neighborhood. In 1873, milk cows were imported from Amsterdam and a dairy was opened in Nahalat Shiv'a. A carriage service to Jaffa Gate was inaugurated that summer.


Jerusalem Railway Station (Mitcham HaRakevet)

The station is closed for many years, but nowadays the railway yard contains many bars and restaurants and is used for many annual events such as Hebrew Book Week. In May 2013, it reopened as a culture and entertainment center.






Culture and Leisure in Jerusalem


Museums | Theaters | Cinemas


Museums

Museum lovers will be delighted to discover that Jerusalem is dotted with dozens of museums full of rich exhibits from all aspects, from art, history, culture, nature and science, with zionist, pacifist or religious background.


List of all museums in Jerusalem:





Theaters

The city of Jerusalem may be home to a larger-than-expected number of theaters and theatrical groups which host plays, shows and concerts of local and international acters from all over the world.


Jerusalem Time Elevator

Phone:  02-6248381
Address:  37 Hilel Street, Agron House
Website:  www.time-elevator-jerusalem.co.il

An essential part of any Jerusalem tour, the Jerusalem Time Elevator carries its passengers on an unforgettable journey through the 3000-odd eventful ... Read more


Train Theater

Phone:  02-561-8514
Address:  Liberty Bell Park, Yemin Moshe/Talbieh
Website: www.traintheater.co.il

Jerusalem's theater scene is thriving, with dozens of plays running the gamut from traditional classics to the furthest-out in fringe showing at any...Read more


Jerusalem Theatre

Phone:  02-560-5755
Address:  Marcus St. 20, Yemin Moshe/Talbieh
Website:  www.jerusalem-theatre.co.il

The city of Jerusalem may be home to a larger-than-expected number of theaters and theatrical groups, but the undeniable crown of the capital's ...Read move


Alpert Music Center

Phone:  02-565-2111
Address:  Old Train Station/Abu Tor
Website:  music-center.jerusalem.muni.il

While Fame may be an American phenomenon, a penchant for music is still well rewarded in Jerusalem. Administered by the Jerusalem Municipality, ...Read more


Gerard Bechar Center

Phone:  02-625-1139
Address:  Bezalel St. 11, Machane Yehuda/Nachlaot
Website: gerard-behar.jerusalem.muni.il

The Gerard Bechar Center occupies a significant chunk of Bezalel Street real estate bordering the Nachlaot and Rechavia neighborhoods. The ...Read more


Hazira

Phone: 02-678-3378
Address:   28 Hebron Rd.
Website: www.hazira.org.il

Israel has a long and distinguished history of theater, both traditional and alternative, with its roots going back to the establishment of the fi...Read move


The Christian Spirit show

Phone:  02-6248381
Address:  37 Hilel Street, Agron House
Website for tickets:

 www.gojerusalem.com

The Voyage Terminal, the people who brought you the popular Jerusalem Time Elevator, a multimedia, multisensory journey through the exciting history o...Read more


Khan Theater

Phone:  02-671-8281
Address:  Remez St. 2, Old Train Station/Abu Tor
Website: www.khan.co.il

The Jerusalem Khan, a Jerusalem Stone, Ottoman-era caravansary where pilgrims and traders would stop if they failed to reach the walls of the Old ...Read more


Zappa - Jerusalem

Phone:  03-7626666 / 9080*
Address:   Derekh Khevron 28, Jerusalem
Website: www.zappa-club.co.il

Zappa Club Jerusalem is Jerusalem lively music club which was established in a comprehensive program to improve cultural and recreational welfare of city residents and visitors, The place has about 350 seats at tables and 600 places to show compliance...Read more


Psik Theater

Phone:  02-651-3663
Address:  Shatner St. 3, Givat Shaul
Website: http://www.psik.org.il

Founded by three young theater school grads in the late '90s, Psik is a Jerusalem theater company and venue with a social conscience. Alongside its fu...Read more





Cinemas

For those who enjoy to spend a quality time with a good movie in the cinema, The city of Jerusalem offers several movie theaters which present new actual movies and also foreign movies.


Yes Planet

Phone: 02-531-3424
Address: Naomi St 4, Jerusalem
Website: www.yesplanet.co.il/jerusalem

Cinema City

Phone: 1-700-702-255
Address: Yitzchak Rabin 10, Jerusalem
Website: www.cinema-city.co.il

Globus Max

Phone: 02-6223686
Address: Sderot Zalman Shazar 1, Biniani Hauma, Jerusalem
Website: www.globusmax.co.il

Jerusalem Theatre Cinema

Phone: 02-560-5755
Address: Marcus St. 20
Website: www.jerusalem-theatre.co.il

Rav Chen

Phone: 02-679-2799
Address: Haoman St. 19, Talpiot
Website: www.tickets.rav-hen.co.il

Third Ear Screening Rooms

Phone: 02-563-3093
Address: Emek Refaim St. 8
Website: www.third-ear.com

Cinematheque

Phone: 02-673-7393
Address: Hebron Rd. 11
Website: www.jer-cin.org.il

Lev Smadar

Phone: 02-561-8168
Address: Lloyd George St. 4
Website: www.lev.co.il





Annual events in Jerusalem

Jerusalem has a busy calendar of events year round to cater for its constant stream of visitors. Aside from the many religious festivals that are observed in Jerusalem, there are an increasing number of secular events and things to do to appeal to all kinds of visitors.
Below is a list of all annual events and festivals in Jerusalem.

January

Festivals

Jerusalem has great variety of festivals to offer, such as Poetry Festival, Be'er Festival, International Summer for Young People in Jerusalem, The official Jerusalem's municipality website brings you a list of all these events.

February

The Jerusalem International Book Fair

The Jerusalem International Book Fair (JIBF) is one of the city's most prestigious international cultural events. First held in 1963, and biennially ever since, JIBF brings writers, publishers, editors and literary agents from around the world together in Jerusalem.

March

The Jerusalem Marathon

- Jerusalem is one of few cities in the world that has a marathon course with such breathtaking and inspirational views for runners to enjoy. There were approximately 10,000 runners in attendance (full marathon, half marathon, and 10K), including 1000 runners from 43 different countries (230 of them from the US). The selected running tracks narrate the story of Jerusalem in the course of 3000 years of this city's history.

Sounds of the Old City

A musical celebration with dozens of shows; musicians, breathtaking performances of music and sound in the passageways, in the squares and on the Old City walls. An Armenian music celebration Traditional Arabic music groups Early Christian music and gospel shows Music and shows inspired by Jewish culture And the festival is also conquering the passageways: musicians, authentic instruments, dozens of special screenings of "Sounds of the Old City" inspired by the different traditions.





Festival of Flavors in the Old City

the Old City of Jerusalem will be filled with flavors and aroma of special dishes. For four nights, special dishes from the four different quarters of the Old City (Moslem, Jewish, Christian and Armenian), are being served. The idea is to embrace the culinary art and the smells and sights of the four cultures that live in the four quarters of the Old City. In each quarter you will find its traditional dishes and culinary culture.

Adloyada

The Adloyada is a Purim carnival which includes a costume parade and takes place in many cities in Israel and even in some cities in the world. In Jerusalem the carnival is usually taking place in Jaffa and Ben Yehuda streets and it inclueds costume parade, and street concerts. The name Adloyada comes from the expression "Ad Lo Yada", meaning "until he couldn't tell". According to this, every Jew should drink wine until he can't tell the difference between the good man and the evil.

April

Jerusalem Arts Festival

The Jerusalem Arts Festival takes place between March to April. The festival has become a tradition and a pivotal event in the cultural life of the city, aiming to promote, to nurture and to encourage the various creative fields and present the general public with unique and quality performances at prices everyone can afford. Shows featuring dance, theatre, music and song presenting the finest amateur and semi-professional groups will be held in the halls of the Jerusalem Theatre, the Khan Theatre, the YMCA Hall, at Shimshon Center – Beit Shmuel, the Gerard Bechar Center, St. Andrew's Church and other sites in the city.

Passover

this is one of the most important holidays in the Jewish calendar, and one of the longest. It is a holiday celebrating liberty. In particular, the time when the Jews fled Egypt and made their way through the dessert to the land of Israel. Since this is a family oriented holiday, almost every shop in the country will be closed on the first day of Passover, though some restaurants remain open for the tourists. During the 7 days of Passover in the middle of the month, you are not supposed to eat bread. Only matzo is allowed, in memory of the flight of the Jews. This is a great time to visit, as spirits are high and festivities abound.

Mimouna

this traditional North African holiday falls at the very end of Passover and focuses on the art of hospitality. The locals make vast amounts of delicious Moroccan food on the night of Mimouna and leave their doors open in invitation to any stranger who wishes to join the celebration. The next day sees a traditional outdoor barbeque, and again, the food is offered freely to anyone passing by.

May

Jerusalem Day

The Jerusalem Day is an Israeli national holiday marking the liberation of the city and its reunification after the Six Day war. The day is marked by state ceremonies, memorial services for soldiers who died in the battle for Jerusalem, parades through downtown Jerusalem, special prayers in synagogues, lectures on Jerusalem-related topics, singing and dancing and many other activities. The day is held in the Hebrew Calendar on 28th of Iyar which is usually between mid-May to the end of the month.

Abu-Gosh Vocal Music Festival

The Abu-Gosh Festival is the leading and most important festival in the Israeli vocal music scene. The Festival has existed in its present layout since 1992, and it takes place twice a year – on Succoth (Oct) and Shavuoth (May) – lasting between three to five days each time. Thousands from all over the country and turn Abu Gosh and its churches into a colorful vocal locale of festivities The Festival's concerts are performed in two churches: the Crusader-Benedictine Church, built in the 12th century, situated in the heart of the village; and the Kiryat Ye'arim Church, situated at the top of the hill, overlooking Abu-Gosh.

The International Writers Festival

The International Writer’s Festival is a biennial event which take place on May, The festival has nearly as many international writers present as Israelis. The main festival program will be held at Mishkenot Sha'ananim, but events will take place in various locations in Jerusalem, including the Jerusalem Cinematheque, Anna Ticho House, the Museum On the Seam, The Yellow Submarine, The Lab, and others.





Student Day of The Hebrew University

Student day in Israel is held usually close to the end of May. In Jerusalem this day comes usually on the same date of Jerusalem Day and provides a day of many various activities for students, from free tours, open markets, free entrance to many places and museums and many concerts. Above all these there is the main concert which includes performances of many famous Israeli and world artists. The concert starts in the evening and last all night long with a dance party until the next morning.

The Israel Festival

The Festival takes place annually for a few weeks in the spring. Throughout the festival, audiences are able to enjoy performances by artists from all over the world, as well as premieres of Israeli works and tributes to leading Israeli artists. The public can also attend a large selection of free performances, including street theatre, children's shows and a nightly jazz club.

Independence Day

as in every country, this is a day full of food, drink, celebration and fireworks. On May 3rd, hundreds of kids run amok with plastic hammers, which are symbols of their patriotism. Party people will find lots of special events at the city’s nightclubs on the eve of the 2nd. On the day itself, every person in the country settles down outside and cooks a barbeque, or Al-haesh, as it’s called in Hebrew. In the evening besides of all the parties, Jerusalem, as a Capital city, has the formal main stage with an Army March, governors speeches, and fireworks.

June

Shavuot

the charming Jewish holiday which celebrates harvest time falls at the beginning of the month. It focuses on nature and it’s customary to wear white clothing and eat lots of fruit and cheese. Children can often be seen wearing little wreathes of flowers on their heads as they trot off to school.

The Jerusalem Festival of Light

The annual Festival of Light Jerusalem colors the old city for eight days with artistic lights. In the evening, the old city’s alleys are turned into an open museum that exhibits unique light statues. The artistic illumination turns the buildings to marvelous monuments. Israelis artists and guest artists participate in this festival. Various kinds of culture shows, guided tours, etc… take place.

Cherry Festival - Gush Etzion

In addition to cherry picking, where you are allowed to eat as much as you like, there will be a farmers market, craft booths, bouncy castles, performances, and more. You can also purchase baskets for filling and taking home with you.

July

One Meter Square Festival

- Jerusalem Poetry Festival
The annual “One Meter Square” festival is the latest installment in what has become a tradition of poetry reading festivals, featuring some of the best poets and musicians. The Festival takes place in the Botanic Garden in the heart of Jerusalem. The participating poets read from their works and talk to audiences in intimate green spaces and in cafés in the garden.

Balabasta Festival – Culture in the Marke

A July festival in the alleyways of the shuk sizzles summer nights with music, art, dance - and, of course, food. Mahane Yehuda, Jerusalem's most colorful "shuk," or marketplace, is usually closed for the evening. But for four Monday nights in July, the Balabasta Festival came to the alleys of the market, courtesy of producer Kobi Frig. The festival is an eclectic mix of everything from wild to sophisticated. Weird sculptures are set up on balconies, and Capoeira and waltzing breaks out on the pavement as bands play music on cobblestones and rooftops.

Israel Wine-Tasting Festival

Wine and art make excellent companions, and the annual Israeli Wine Tasting Festival takes place at the Israel Museum between July and August. Thousands of visitors each summer enjoy the cool Jerusalem air and the romantic setting of the illuminated sculptures by night. Admission to the festival is 80 NIS per person, and includes a wineglass, which can be re-filled throughout the evening, as one strolls from stall to stall, learning about the different Israeli vineyards and wineries, and sampling their wares. For more information visit the Israel Museum's website.





The Jerusalem March For Pride and Tolerance

Pride parades are held for years all over the world in order to mark the equal rights of the Homo-Lesbian community. From the 90th it is held also in Israel and since 2002 it is held on Jerusalem. The Jerusalem Pride Parade is called "Jerusalem March for Pride and Tolerance".

Jerusalem Film Festival

The annual Jerusalem Film Festival takes place in July. During the festival’s days, quality Israeli films and films from lot of other countries are displayed. Out of the consensus films as documentary films, avant-garde, etc… are shown. The shows take place in Jerusalem cinemateque, in Sultan's Pool and in various halls over the city. Professional conferences, lectures, workshops and events are open to the public.

The Maccabiah

The Maccabiah is an international Jewish athletic event, held in Israel every four years under the auspices of the Maccabi Federation, affiliated with the Maccabi World Union. The third Maccabiah, scheduled for 1938, was delayed until 1950 due to the rise of Nazism in Europe and the outbreak of the Second World War. The Maccabiah has been a quadrennial event since 1957. Maccabiah is open to Jewish athletes as well as Israeli athletes regardless of religion.

August

The International Festival of Puppet Theater Jerusalem

The International Festival of Puppet Theater Jerusalem promises the young and adult visitors a week of adventure and a unique theatrical experience in The Train Theater, The Festival selects performances based on variety, quality and relevance, and have hosted many artists known for their contribution to the field of puppetry and Visual Theater. During the years, the Festival has become the primal source of creation and inspiration in the field of Puppet Theater in Israel.

Festival Khutzot Hayotzer - Art & craft fair

The festival is taking place for three weeks every year in August and has become a tradition in Jerusalem and the largest tourist attraction of the Jerusalem summer season. More than 150 of the best of Israel's artist and artisans exhibit paintings, prints, ceramics, metalwork and jewelry, weaving and textiles, Judaica, toys, crafts in various techniques, works in wood and more. Guest artists and artisans from all over the world exhibit their authentic and varied arts and crafts in unique booths.

Beer Festival

The Jerusalem Beer Festival at the historic train station. The Jerusalem Beer Festival is considered one of the largest, impressive and leading beer events in the country and the most attractive gathering of young adult audience in the Holy City. Over 50,000 liters of more than a hundred brands from all over the world will be offered, mainstream, boutique and local brewed. During the two-day festival, the historic train station will become a huge bar with impressive structures and luxurious attractions.





Annual Kite-Flying Festival

A colorful kite-flying event, a long-standing tradition at the Israel Museum In conjunction with the exhibition Crossplay: Male Actors, Female Roles in Kabuki Theatre Kite-making workshops, Kite-flying and musical parade of giant puppets. For more information visit the Israel Museum's website.

Jerusalem Woodstock Revival

The Jerusalem Woodstock Revival is now a firm part of Israel’s summer-time event calendar. Whilst the original Woodstock festival happened a long time ago and the festival no longer lives on, the music does. In Israel the mix of music from the summer of ’69 remains ever-popular, combined with modern-day hits. And it’s for that reason that now, for the fourth consecutive year, Jerusalem hosts a 5-hour music marathon.

September

The Jerusalem International Chamber Music Festival

The Jerusalem International Chamber Music Festival is held, every year, in the end of August – beginning of September. This is a series of concerts performed by leading Israelis and international artists and compositions. The concerts are held in YMCA concert hall in Jerusalem.The festival's program, lineup information and the admission fee cost are present in the festival's website.

Piyut Festival Jerusalem

The artists and the festival’s shows create a marvelous linkage between the ancient Hebrew holiness poetry and the nowadays culture.
The reach program which includes workshops is presented in the event’s website.

Rosh HaShanah

Rosh HaShanah (Jewish New Year) is one of the most important religious day of the Jewish year. It is a day of celebrating the new Jewish year, accouring to the Jewish tradition the day is counted since the birth day of Adam (Genesis). There is a special reverent atmosphere around the country as people wear white and go to synagogues.

October

Tzuba March

Tzuba March that takes place every year in the intermediate days of Sukkoth, started in 2009. The four km course of the march is convenient. It passes through the marvelous views of Judah Mountains and among the vineyards in front of Jerusalem corridor communities and the environment. Along the course the participants can enjoy creation stands for children, drumming circles, wine tastes of Tzuba winery, and other surprises. Time tables, maps and filling fee are displayed in Tzuba website.

Gush Etzion Festival

Gush-Etzion Theater and Jewish Music Festival that started in 2001 proves itself as one of the reach contents Jewish culture events. The festival is held, every year, in the local youth cultural center in Gush-Etzion in the intermediate days of Sukkoth. The festival hosts Jewish music shows and theater plays that deal with the nowadays Jewish identity performed by diverse theater groups. Artists’ fair, food fair, music and theater workshops, creation workshops for the whole family are held in addition to the stage’s shows. For more information call: +972-2-9937999 /2

The Jerusalem March

- Every year at the annual Sukkot parade, thousands of tourists and Israelis stroll down Jerusalem's streets smiling and waving flags from around the world. The annual Sukkot parade is organized by the Jerusalem municipality and other official bodies. In addition, the committee barred participation in various events planned by the International Christian Embassy at the Jerusalem International Convention Center in celebration of the holiday.

The International Pomegranate Festival in Ein Yael

Celebrate the mythical pomegranate of 613 seeds (go ahead- count!) at the Pomegranate Festival in Ein Yael. At this live museum, set in a lovely natural surroundings of the Jerusalem outskirts, enjoy actors performances, pomegranate jam competitions, arts and crafts with ceramics and even pomegranate dye, and more. Learn about the significance of the pomegranate to our land, history and heritage. The festival takes place during Sukkot holiday in Ein Yael Living Museum. For more information call 02-645-1866





Abu-Gosh Vocal Music Festival

The Abu-Gosh Festival is the leading and most important festival in the Israeli vocal music scene. The Festival has existed in its present layout since 1992, and it takes place twice a year – on Succoth (Oct) and Shavuoth (May) – lasting between three to five days each time. Thousands from all over the country and turn Abu Gosh and its churches into a colorful vocal locale of festivities The Festival's concerts are performed in two churches: the Crusader-Benedictine Church, built in the 12th century, situated in the heart of the village; and the Kiryat Ye'arim Church, situated at the top of the hill, overlooking Abu-Gosh.

Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) is the most important religious day of the year for Jews. It is a day of fasting and to ask for forgiveness. There is a special reverent atmosphere around the city as people wear white and ponder over their deeds of the past year. The hotels will still serve food, but literally everything else all over Israel shuts down on this day. A walk in the Old City of Jerusalem will give you a unique spirtual experience.

Sukkot

this important holiday is another harvest festival which has been celebrated since biblical times. During this 7 day holiday, it is tradition to build a tent made from palm leaves and white sheets. Children decorate the interior with colourful paper art and the whole family is supposed to eat and sleep in the Sukka throughout the week. Sukkoth is one of the most eventful holidays, with dozens of festivals and interesting cultural events taking place all over the city.

November

Jerusalem International Oud Festival

The Festival is known as the most qualitative and biggest of its kind. The festival which became part of the culture in Jerusalem brings each year in November the beauty and the influence of the Arabic and Middle East music on the western music by creating "a natural bridge" between the cultures and the musical traditions. The festival combines between east and west and between various ethnic groups by using the Oud which is the leading music instrument among the eastern music instruments.

Jerusalem Knights Festival

The old city of Jerusalem turns, once a year, to a Knight city. The festival that is aimed to the whole family holds street shows performed by Israeli artists and guest from various countries. The visitors can see knights’ fights, fire stunts, dance with Middle Ages style and costumes, meetings with "archaic" figures in the old city’s alleys, etc… The festival is free of charge.

December

Meorot convention

The annual Meorot convention at The Hebrew university (Givhat Ram) is a celebration of the possible, the nearly possible and the imagined. The convention, dedicated to science and Science Fiction, includes lecture, panels and special events, all dealing with one of the most interesting questions facing mankind today – what's next? What will our lives look like as technology changes and evolves? How will we shape our world and ourselves? What kind of society will we create for ourselves? Each year a topic at the forefront of scientific research as the focus for all activities in the convention and this time it is Biodiversity.

Hanukkah

this Jewish holiday serves a similar function as Christmas does for Christians. A favorite of children, Hanukkah is actually the celebration of a miracle. When the Israelis recaptured the Temple from the Greeks, they had only one small vessel of oil left to light the temple. Yet somehow this tiny amount lasted for 8 days until more oil could be made. Thus, the holiday’s main focus is on light and oil and the return of power to the Israeli people. During these 8 days, Jerusalem offers many activities and parties for kids and adults.

Sylvester Eve

New Years Eve in Israel has become bigger and bigger in recent years, and whilst not officially celebrated, and there are now hundreds of New Years Eve parties across Israel, as well as many other special events, which cater to all musical, cultural, and social tastes. New Years in Israel is known as Sylvester, and parties are known as Sylvester parties. From the bustling Sylvester parties in Jerusalem’s many nightclubs to special concerts and local events, if you want to see in the New Year in Israel, you will find a celebration for you.







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